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admiralpulaski:

No, I don’t blindly love on female characters. It’s all in the math. I try to approach everything with a 100%, resulting in a slightly biased 55% love potential for the ladies and 45% for the men. However, of you give me a 7:1 ratio of men to women, that leaves 55% love for the singular female character and 6.43% love for each male character. Therefore, my devotion is completely justified by the numbers, it’s not me, it’s science.

(via katiedoyle)

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won’t have as much censorship because we won’t have as much fear.
Judy Blume (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

(via smashfizzle)

notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

(via caffeinatedfeminist)

Other people are not medicine.
Amy Poehler (via ugh)

(via bookoisseur)

We don’t often talk about men being imprisoned by gender stereotypes, but I can see that they are — and that when they are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence.

katespencer:

amyspalding:

tinaseroticfriendfic:

nethilia:

We as a writing society need to bring back Girl Gangs Doing Shit Together in book series. The late 80s/early 90s was BOSS at that shit.

YES!

Oh my god YES. These books were huge inspirations for me.

True Story: I took my daughter to Barnes & Noble the other day to buy a birthday present for a friend, and I searched high and low in the kids section for these books. How naive of me to assume they’d still be there. 

Taffy Sinclair 4ever.

ottoreal:

"Let her speak when we get to the black topics."

Why does this not have a Billion notes!!!!!!

(via huminthesun)

I used to dream about one day being at Wimbledon. I could taste the strawberries and cream I could see myself curtseying there at center court. And I didn’t make it there, obviously, as a tennis player, but let me tell you even though I had a mic in my hand instead of a tennis racket for ESPN when I went to cover it for the first time; to me it was like ‘check! Wimbledon.’ You have to be creative in reaching your goals and I think that’s what really helped me so much in my life both professionally and personally. Just not being too rigid. Having goals and setting goals, but being flexible with them and knowing that it might not quite look like how I think it’s going to look and that’s okay.