latenightseth:

Sounds like Jenny Slate’s inner child came out a little later in life.

(via sarahjez)

way-harsh-tai:

Everything Beyonce does is careful and thought out. Her entire image is perfection crafted from planning ahead. She does not ‘wing it’ or throw things into her performances and public appearances ‘just because’.

What she did at this award show was amazing, especially because of how intentional and thought out it clearly was.

Feminism is a scary word for a lot of people. Many women are afraid of calling themselves feminist because they think it implies anger, hatred of men, or a rejection of traditional femininity. 

Beyonce presented everyone watching with two distinct images of what many viewers viewed as two very different women. There is the strong, independent FEMINIST. She is the woman who likes being in control and being in the spotlight. Then there is the WIFE and MOTHER. She is soft, sweet, smiling at the husband and child you can tell she loves and values so much.

For every girl watching who was afraid to be a feminist, afraid to be powerful, because of what she thought she would lose, this is an incredible message. You can be all the things you want to be. You can be both. Feminists can have amazing happy, full lives full of both traditional and modern womanhood. 

Feminism means gender should not be a source of persecution or a restriction of your choices. Feminism mean the type of person you should be is based on what you value, not what outside forces pressure you to value because of your gender or biological sex. Shout at the top of your lungs that you are a feminist and proud. Then go and be the exact person that you want to be. 

(via specialedition87)


"I wanted to look like the Chrysler Building," she said, pointing to her long sapphire and diamond earrings. "I know what to expect here now, but anyone who tells you they’re not nervous before they call your name is lying." x

"I wanted to look like the Chrysler Building," she said, pointing to her long sapphire and diamond earrings. "I know what to expect here now, but anyone who tells you they’re not nervous before they call your name is lying." x

Outside. It’s a great place to meet strangers and interact with them socially. Here are some snippets of conversations that strangers started with me.

Random Guy: [Walking uncomfortably close and saying something I can’t hear because I’m wearing headphones]

Me: [Taking off headphones] I couldn’t hear you, what?

RG: [Not looking directly at me] How are you doing?

Me: I don’t know you.

RG: I’m asking, how are you doing?

Me: That’s kind of rude… [continued]

God, I have a million of these stories I could share. 

My favorite is the garbage man asking me for my number while I was on a run. Ummm, no. 

A regular recurrence is the question, “Are you married?” Because if I’m not, then THAT gives you permission to comment on the way I look?! Ugh. 

The relationship between my feminism and my faith is symbiotic and interchangeable, one feeding the other with questions and ideas, the other responding with theories and practices. But really, I don’t believe they can be weighed. As I said earlier, it’s a false equivalency that reduces me to an impossible binary. I don’t have to be a “Christian feminist” anymore than I have to call myself a feminist who happens to be a Christian.
Here is the body I’ve been refusing to hide. The urge is there. I am often embarrassed by what you see in this picture. There are so many times I look at those thighs, that belly, and those arms and I think, “How dare you force your largeness on the rest of the world.” Isn’t that fucking nuts? So, I have my pity party, then I move on. In a way. In my own way.
Ashley Ford, 5 Things (8/10/14)

Whoa.


“Clare Boothe Luce, born March 10, 1903, came of age in an era when to be as blond, athletic, and good-looking as she was came with a set of expectations quite different from what she delivered. Instead, ambitious and sharp-tongued, she emerged as a pioneering media visionary as the managing editor of Vanity Fair, a celebrated playwright, and a formidable congresswoman. In 1944, she became the first woman ever to deliver the keynote address at a national political convention. Her 1953 appointment as Ambassador to Italy made her the first female American ambassador to major post abroad.”

Read more: 
Clare Boothe Luce’s Advice to Her 18-Year-Old Daughter via brainpickings

Clare Boothe Luce, born March 10, 1903, came of age in an era when to be as blond, athletic, and good-looking as she was came with a set of expectations quite different from what she delivered. Instead, ambitious and sharp-tongued, she emerged as a pioneering media visionary as the managing editor of Vanity Fair, a celebrated playwright, and a formidable congresswoman. In 1944, she became the first woman ever to deliver the keynote address at a national political convention. Her 1953 appointment as Ambassador to Italy made her the first female American ambassador to major post abroad.”

Read more: 

Clare Boothe Luce’s Advice to Her 18-Year-Old Daughter via brainpickings

#whiskeyface

These are great! Except for number 3, they all apply to me too.

Women in leadership, like millennials, are a sign of successful companies. Of the participating organization, those in the top 20% financially had almost twice as many women in leadership roles, as well as more high-potential women holding those roles.