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We’re all strange inside. We learn how to disguise our differences as we grow up.
Annie Proulx, The Shipping News (via misswallflower)

I'll never miss a beat, I'm lightning on my feet

I love everything about these gifs. Good job whoever made them!

(via voguetaylor)

tielan:

cumberpetersleston:

harto-helbig:

netzmare:

scaenica:

[x]

I FUCKING LOVE THIS.

bUT NOTES

thejokertho

I kind of told my sixth grade teacher this in front of the class when she said “Ladies don’t do that.”

(via chelseasmile27)

humansofnewyork:

"When we graduate, my friend and I want to start an organization to teach people in rural areas how to read. I was volunteering at a clinic last year, and I saw a child die of Cholera because the mother couldn’t remember the prescription instructions."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

jellyworld:

Please let yourself be proud of small things. Please do that. Please allow yourself to get really excited about playing a video game well or sending an ask you were nervous about or letting a bug outside or peeling the whole orange in one try. Please get so excited about that. Please. That’s so cool I’m so glad you did it.

(via thefuhrmenator)

I love that the headline doesn’t even mention the fact that these are all ladies! And I mean that seriously, not sarcastically. How often do you see the word ‘female’ qualifying lists like this? All the damn time. This just states it like it is: they are leaders, no gender call out needed.

Why hasn’t everyone reblogged this?

Why hasn’t everyone reblogged this?

(via bookoisseur)

On Being Yourself

There’s a pit in your stomach, a pit like a peach, with an urchin wrapped around it. The creature called Self Doubt. You struggle to pry its fingers off the pit, to set it free.

If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that the best way to be is yourself. Be it in every way possible. Be.

This means laughing at the things you find funny, and not laughing at those you don’t. It means saying yes to the things that make you feel good, and saying no to everything else. It means sharing secrets, because when you put yourself out there, the world offers up the kindness and compassion of strangers.

Know that people will respond to what you say, so say what you mean and mean what you say. If you present yourself truly, then their response will be yours, to you, and for you.

Do not feed the urchin in your gut. It loves half-hearted laughter and the sour taste of lies. You feed it falsities, in hopes that you can make others believe in a different you. But the urchin grows bigger, clutching the pit in your stomach and pressing it ever tighter.

The urchin knows your façade is fragile. It knows the false impressions you put forth are based on insecurities. Those are what he whispers when you sleep. Those are what he feeds you in your dreams, waiting for you to serve them up fresh in the morning.

The creature can be silenced only by truth. Fight him with authenticity and self-expression. Find these within yourself, and pour them out, not in. Pour out. Pour into the world, and starve the creature of his sustenance. Pour out your joy. Pour out your passion and your sorrow. Pour it out, and it will come flooding back, pure and strong and fearless. You will be fortified, and you will not lose.

When you have done this, the creature will know it is time to go. Faced with you, the real you, shining bright and mirrored truthfully in a sea of friendly faces, the creature will release its grip and relinquish the pit - a bubble.

(via liquid-diamonds-flowing)

Very true, Michelle. Very true.

(via thefuhrmenator)

oupacademic:

Joanna Bourke, author of The Story of Pain, on the bizarre history of the relationship between women and pain. 

(via engrprof)

And then I saw that Melissa Fumero had been cast as Amy Santiago on Brooklyn Nine-Nine, and I felt my guts roll up into my throat and try to escape out of my mouth. Omgomgomgomg that’s it then. There’s no way in hell a major network is gonna cast two Latina actresses in such a tight ensemble show I AM SCREWED.

And then next day my agents called and told me I’d booked it.

I couldn’t believe it. I had been saying to my boyfriend the night before how there was JUST NO WAY. Normally, The Latina is a singular element of the ensemble she is working in. She’s there to provide contrast, or sexuality, or humor. Or she’s there to clean the floors and/or steal your man. There are some serious stereotypes very much alive in film and TV today, and The Latina is one of them.

Here’s the thing though. The world is changing. Slowly but surely, television is changing. The character stereotypes are changing, or being turned inside out by some fantastic writers and actors (I’m looking at you, Orange is the New Black, Scandal, and The Mindy Project). People of color are on TV playing roles that are fleshed out, complex, human. And yes, some of those characters are maids. Some are sexy heartbreakers there to steal your man. Some own BBQ joints, while some are Chiefs of Staff. Some are prisoners, and some are cops. All are real people with hopes, dreams, ambitions, fears, and all the other vast human emotions and desires…

…This is important. Because young women are watching TV, and they are getting messages about who they are in the world, who the world will allow them to be. And in big important steps, television is showing a reflection back to those young women that YOU CAN BE WHATEVER THE HELL YOU DAMN WELL PLEASE, and that two Latinas on one show is NORMAL. I think that’s a win for everybody.

disabilityinkidlit:

[photo of a school assignment that says: “Writing in Math. Evan told his class that the people in his family have 14 legs altogether. Quinton said Evan must have 7 people in his family. Is Quinton correct Explain why or why not.” The answer given is: “Yes, because 14 : 2 = 7, but not everyone has two legs. Go to www.woundedwarriorproject.org.]

amydentata:

southern-feminism:

Inclusive children go far.

Kids are too smart for this school crap.

(via rinceya)

explore-blog:

What beloved chef Julia Child, born on August 15, 1912, can teach us about entrepreneurship and perseverance – wisdom culled from her letters to her best friend and publishing partner.